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DEAR DESCENDANTS
FAMILY BUSINESS PHOTOS
Home
WHO ARE WE?
CENTENARIANS (new content August 2002)
HANING PHOTOS
WRIGHT PHOTOS
BROOKS PHOTOS
PETTY PHOTOS
MORE PETTY PHOTOS
FAMILY BUSINESS PHOTOS
PETTY AND BROOKS PHOTOS
BABY PICTURES
FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES
BROOKS LINE
HANING LINE
DAVIS/HAWK OR HOCK LINES
PETTY LINE
HINCHEY/BARTLETT LINES
WRIGHT/MASON LINE
DOCUMENTS AND OTHER EVIDENCE
HISTORY'S MYSTERIES
THE ANSWER PAGE
WHERE THEY LIVED
THEN AND NOW
THESE RELATIVES ARE NOT ABSOLUTE
BACK TO ADAM
FAMILY MEMBER KENNETH BROOKS
FAMILY MEMBER ROZELLAH PETTY BROOKS
ROZELLAH'S EDUCATION
FAMILY MEMBER WILLIAM HENRY BROOKS
FAMILY MEMBER GRANDMA FANNIE
FAMILY MEMBER GEORGE BROOKS
FAMILY MEMBER EVA HANING BROOKS
FAMILY MEMBERS FRANK AND ANNIE HANING
FAMILY MEMBER WALTER PETTY
FAMILY MEMBER VIRLIE MASON PETTY
FAMILY MEMBER ANDREW JACKSON PETTY
FAMILY MEMBER SARAH ELIZABETH HINCHEY
THE LOVE STORIES
FURRY FAMILY MEMBERS
1936 NEWSPAPER
MEMORABILIA
MEMORABILIA II
FAMILY HEROES
VERSES
OUR MUSICAL FAMILY
OUR FISHING FAMILY
CHRISTMAS
CELEBRATIONS
RECIPES 1
RECIPES 2
GETTING GRANNY'S GOAT
TIDBITS
THE OIL BOOM
RESEARCHING MY FAMILY HISTORY
RESEARCHING MY FAMILY HISTORY, PAGE 2
ABOUT ME
FUTURE HEIRLOOMS

Work Page

The earliest American members of the Petty family lived in the colony of Virginia and were probably tobacco farmers. I base that assumption on two facts. (1) At least one historian has said that Virginia was "built on smoke" because tobacco farming was its main industry. (2) I was told that the Petty family in Tennessee raised tobacco before the civil war. It makes sense to believe that, after moving to Tennessee, they continued to do what family members in Virginia and North Carolina had done.

After the civil war, not being able to continue tobacco farming without slave labor, they set up a sawmill and began to cut down the trees that were on their land. The sawmill is shown below.

PETTY LINE

Tennessee sawmill

This is the Petty family's sawmill in Tennessee. The man on the left with his long legs crossed is my grandfather, Walter. Later, he got one of his legs caught in the machinery and it never healed completely. I'll tell the story later on the "Family Heroes" page.

store.jpg

One of two grocery stores owned by the Petty family in Davis, Oklahoma. This was the big one, run by Andrew Jackson Petty. A smaller one on "the wrong side of the tracks" was run by Walter Petty. The man on the far right is A.J. Petty. I called him "Granddaddy." I barely remember him, since I was three or four years old when he died. I don't know who the others in the picture are.

GROCERY STORE INTERIOR
store_interior.jpg
CUSTOMER IS UNIDENTIFIED

DETAIL OF THE STORE CEILING
ceiling.jpg
IF ONLY WE COULD SEE THE COLORS!

storefront.jpg

Outside the grocery store pictured above. Identification in my mother's handwriting.

WALTER PETTY WITH SOME OF HIS CUSTOMERS
store_n_customers.jpg

A COMMEMORATION OF OLD-TIME BUSINESSES
embroidery.jpg
THIS HANGS IN THE DAVIS MUSEUM THAT IS HOUSED IN THE OLD SANTA FE DEPOT

The following ad appeared in
The Davis News, Davis, Murray County Oklahoma, February 7, 1924
 
To make good biscuits like mother used to make, try Made-Right Flour, it is made right and sold by A.J. Petty of Davis and E.L. Morton of Hennepin.